Werner Bischof - Caryatids, Acropolis, Athens, 1946


20aliens:

Avtovo metro station, St. Petersburg
by Andrew Miksys


seafarers:

Morning in Prague by Markus Grunau


homedesigning:

Zen Garden Design


naturehomes:

source


le-plus-beau-des-mensonges:

Venus Grotto in Ludwig II’s Linderhof Palace

"The grotto is wholly artificial and was built for the king as an illustration of the First Act of Wagner’s "Tannhäuser”. Ludwig liked to be rowed over the lake in his golden swan-boat but at the same time he wanted his own Blue Grotto of Capri. Therefore 24 dynamos had been installed and so already in the time of Ludwig II it was possible to illuminate the grotto in changing colours.”



allofthefresh:

The Hall of Mirrors reflects the reign of the Sun King in Versailles, France, July 1989


salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 


oh-girl-among-the-roses:

The Chinese Palace, built by Antonio Rinaldi, between 1762 and 1768, on the grounds of Oranienbaum park in Russia